During an emergency, your best protection is preparation. Knowing what to do will help you stay safe and better control of the situation.
The following information will help you prepare for specific emergencies, including:

Power Outage
Turn the thermostat(s) down to minimum and turn off all appliances, electronic equipment and tools to prevent injury, damage to equipment and fire. Power can be restored more easily when the system is not overloaded. Do not use barbecues or camping heating equipment or home generators indoors
Use a flashlight. If you must use candles, be sure to use proper candleholders. Never leave lit candles unattended.

Generators are an option for backup electricity, however:

Alert: Using Food When the Power Goes Off

Alert: Cooking Without Electricity

Winter Power Failure:
If the power outage leaves you without heat for some time and there is a threat of pipes freezing or bursting, drain the pipes and shut off the main water supply. As you drain your pipes you may want to collect the water in clean containers for drinking and cleaning purposes. Open all faucets including your water heater. If your water heater is electric, drain the hot water heating system by turning it off and leaving the valves open. Add plumbing antifreeze to the toilet and other pipes with standing water. If you have a septic tank, antifreeze could damage it so make sure you pump the chemical from the plumbing fixtures and pipes before they are refilled with water.
Energy Conservation Recommendations

Severe winter storms can cause widespread damage and disruption. Heavy snow often results in paralyzed transportation systems, automobile accidents due to slippery roads and stranded vehicles. When accompanied by intense winds and extreme cold, snow can isolate entire communities. Bitter cold and severe winter storms kill more than 100 people in Canada every year. That is more than the number of Canadians killed by tornadoes, thunderstorms, lightning, floods, hurricanes and heat waves combined.
Ice storms are often winter’s worst hazard. The severity of ice storms depends on the accumulation of ice, the duration of the event, the location and extent of the area affected.
During a blizzard, piercing winds blow snow into drifts that can bury people, animals and possessions. The snow loads can also cause the collapse of structures. In the later stages of a blizzard whiteout conditions can be formed. During a whiteout the snowfall is so dense that it is hard to tell the earth from the sky.
If you are indoors

If you are outdoors

If you are in a vehicle

Severe Lightning Storm
Thunderstorms bring a wide range of threats. These include hail, lightning, strong winds and heavy rainfall. All of these hazards can result in property damage, injuries or fatalities. React immediately when you first see lightning, hear thunder or are given some other warning. There are a few simple precautions that you can take to protect yourself
If you are indoors

If you are outdoors

If you are in a vehicle

Flood or Flash Flood
WHAT IS A FLASH FLOOD?
Flash floods develop from intense thunderstorms dropping large amounts of water in a short time. Flash floods occur with little or no warning. During periods of urban flooding, streets can become swift moving rivers and basements can fill with water.
If you are indoors

If you are outdoors

If you are in a vehicle

Tornado
Tornadoes result from hot, humid weather meeting a cold front. With these conditions, a tornado could be imminent. A funnel cloud hanging from a dark cloud may appear before the tornado actually occurs. A tornado may be accompanied by lightening, high winds and hail.
If you are indoors

If you are outdoors

Infectious Disease Outbreak
In case of a respiratory (airborne) infectious disease outbreak, the most important thing to do is to listen to the radio and follow recommendations to prevent and contain the spread of the disease.
Respiratory infections are generally spread by small droplets in the air that can settle on surfaces. To prevent the spread:

Hazardous Chemical Release
Responding to an emergency involving a spill or a fire resulting from a hazardous spill is the same as all other emergencies, except that you may be evacuated or be advised to "shelter in place".
Shelter in place means to remain indoors during the release of an airborne hazardous material. You should move out of the way of smoke or fumes and seek shelter indoors. DO NOT go through smoke or fumes. Remaining inside a building or vehicle can reduce your exposure to 1/10 of that of the outdoors. Close all doors and windows tightly. Shut off air conditioners, fans, and close all dampers, etc. which bring air in from the outside. Do not use kitchen fans, bathroom vents, clothes dryers, fireplaces, etc. Compartmentalize your house by closing all interior doors. Place wet towels under doors to prevent the entry of smoke and fumes into your home. If fumes threaten you, cover your mouth and nose with a wet handkerchief or towel. Monitor your radio or television for additional information or instructions.
Evacuate only if told to do so, do not approach the scene of the release. Back off as quickly as possible. Listen to the advice of local officials on the radio or television to determine what steps you will need to take to protect yourself.
Evacuation Procedures During an Emergency
During some emergencies, it may be necessary to protect our citizens by evacuating the area impacted by the emergency. An emergency evacuation centre may be set up to provide shelter and food to people affected by the emergency. If there were a need to be evacuated, you would be notified.